San Francisco is an extreme example of what is wrong with planning in American cities in general: Governed out of fear and beholden to the haves, it mandates tall and mediocre buildings of the wrong kind (office buildings) in the wrong places for people who do not need them nearly as much as the thousands of lower wage-earners drawn to the boom.
"Enterprise software" is software that gets sold to a so-called
enterprise. Native English speakers might think an “enterprise” is
something brave, noble, and dangerous, such as starting a small
business, but in this case, “enterprise” is used to mean the opposite:
the executives of a large, risk-averse company have chosen to flatter
themselves by pretending that they’re engaged in something brave,
noble, and dangerous.
A new report from Arch City Defenders, a non-profit legal defense organization, shows that the Ferguson municipal courts are a stunning example of these problems…

You don’t get $321 in fines and fees and 3 warrants per household from an about-average crime rate. You get numbers like this from bullshit arrests for jaywalking and constant “low level harassment involving traffic stops, court appearances, high fines, and the threat of jail for failure to pay.”

Perhaps this is why people consider mathematics a bridge between human language and programming. Because it allows you to express more formal ideas in a more concrete language, without making you worry about such specific hardware details like whether your integers are capped at 32 bits or 64. Indeed, if you think that the core of programming is expressing abstract ideas in a concrete language, then this makes a lot of sense.
Programming is not math, huh? - Jeremy Kun

(Misleading title, good article)

As far as I see it right now, the BPjM leak is a responsible and justified disclosure to highlight the glaring security problems with the German government censorship system. But much more importantly than that, it highlights the chilling implications of allowing an unelected, anti-judicial government censorship agency to publish an arbitrary, secret blacklist with no public inspection or due process of law for those who have been falsely accused.
the result of a European court ruling that individuals had the right to remove material about themselves from search engine results, arrived in the Guardian’s inbox this morning, in the form of an automated notification that six Guardian articles have been scrubbed from search results. The first six articles down the memory hole – there will likely be many more as the rich and powerful look to scrub up their online images, doubtless with the help of a new wave of “reputation management” firms – are a strange bunch.